Category Archives: Politics

Bob’s comments on politics in general

GuideStar is not guiding at all

July 10, 2017

By Bob Cox

Some opinions, comments and links relating to what is happening in this great nation and, in particular, in Western Colorado.

 

Several years ago I began using information that I obtained through a non-profit tracker called GuideStar. They make a lot of information available on organizations that fall under our tax laws as tax-exempt because of their non-profit status. The most common of these organizations fall under the Internal Revenue Code 501 (c) (3). Under the laws the non-profits must file a tax form known at the IRS Form 990, which requires information as to who is paid what and how funds are dispersed

Those organizations filing under the 501 (c) (3) rule are supposed to be held to a very strict standard as to how much they can be involved in political activities. It has been my contention for many years that many of these organizations cheat on the requirements. I wrote several editorials about certain non-profits that I deemed to be nothing more than thinly veiled political activist organizations and I depended on the information I obtained from GuideStar.

Recently I became aware of GuideStar beginning to label certain non-profits as “hate groups.” More information on that has become available in the last several days and it looks as though all of these so-called hate groups seem to lean toward the conservative side of things.

I am not naive enough to tell you that there are no conservative-leaning non-profits nor are they all different in that they bend the tax laws to their own benefit. What I will say is that GuideStar has no business putting the “hate group” designation on anyone, and especially when they themselves are showing an extreme bias.

Jacob Harold, the president of GuideStar is showing us all that he is a political activist. That makes me wonder about the information from GuideStar that I have been dependent upon. I start to wonder why there are some groups who do not seem to have their 990s available on a timely basis. Is that incompetency on the part of the non-profit or their accountants or is it because someone at GuideStar is holding the information back? I am not accusing either way, but rather pointing out that GuideStar’s actions have caused me some doubt, and that cannot be good. I have also noted with interest that others are becoming vocal about GuideStar’s obvious liberal bias. I have always been uncomfortable about GuideStar being so closely associated with the Southern Poverty Law Center, now I can justify that lack of comfort.

GuideStar has, as near as I can find out, declared more than two dozen non-profits as hate groups. None of them even come close to being on the liberal side of things. The message: Conservatives bad, liberals good.

Remember, I only send out these missives to those who have asked for them. I do not share your email addresses with anyone and I use the Reagan email precisely because they don’t share or sell the addresses either. If you are getting this because someone forwarded it to you and you don’t want it, tell him or her not to forward any more. On the other hand, if you received a copy and would like to see more of my ranting, simply drop me a line at coxnotes@Reagan.com I will put you on my exclusive, but growing list.

 

Bob

 

© Robert R. Cox 2017

 

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Judge Gorsuch – His nomination and appointment was necessary

April 10, 2017

By Bob Cox

Some opinions, comments and links relating to what is happening in this great nation and, in particular, in Western Colorado.

From the very beginning of the 2016 presidential campaign I said that the one most important reason for defeating Hillary Clinton, and for that matter, Bernie Sanders, was the probability that the next president would be making at least one appointment to the Supreme Court. In February 2016, when Judge Antonin Scalia died, the situation became critical.

Of course, President Obama jumped at the chance to make the election inconsequential in the next Supreme Court nomination by immediately proposing a very liberal-minded Merrick Garland. He did so, in my humble opinion, to further the efforts on behalf of the left to continue their legacy of using the courts in lieu of the legislature as much as possible.

When it became apparent that the new president would, in fact, be nominating a replacement for Judge Scalia, the election took on an even more important sense of importance as far as I was concerned. One thing I really hoped for was that we in Colorado could replace Michael Bennet, the Democrat senator. I knew that Bennet would line up behind his liberal colleagues to try to block any nomination, should a Republican win the Whitehouse. I was right of course, but I held on to some hope that he would find it within himself to back a Colorado judge. On that, I quickly determined that my hopes were wrong.

My support of Darryl Glenn in his efforts to unseat Bennet began early in Glenn’s campaign. It would have been so good to have both of our senators working with each other, rather than always cancelling each other’s votes. I don’t know if it would have made a difference, but I was so disappointed that Senator Cory Gardner did not do more to support Glenn. He (Gardner) even travelled to another state to support their candidate rather than stepping up behind Glenn at home. That is all water under the bridge.

I exchanged e-mails with Sen. Bennet on several occasions and I still held out hope, when he assisted Sen. Gardner in introducing Judge Gorsuch to the Senate. I hoped against hope that Sen. Bennet would for once look like a Coloradoan rather than just another fall-in-line Democrat when he emailed me saying in part, “…I will oppose efforts to filibuster his nomination.” He also said, “I take seriously the Senate’s constitutional responsibility to thoroughly vet Judge Gorsuch.”

If he actually took his responsibility “seriously” he would have said so, rather than participate in the dog-and-pony show that the Democrats put on during the hearings. And, of course, he did not have to vote for cloture because all that was prearranged as to who would be part of the defeat of that motion.

What he could have done was to vote for Judge Gorsuch in the end. There again, his vote would not have not changed a thing, but it would have demonstrated to some of us serious Colorado residents that the guy had something other than pure partisan blood in his system.

I doubt seriously that I will agree with everything the Supreme Court does over the next few years, but I know one thing for sure: It will not be as easy as it could have been for the extreme left-wingers of this nation to legislate from the bench and we are getting just a little closer to having three branches of government once again.

Remember, I only send out these missives via email to those who have asked for them. I do not share your email addresses with anyone and I use the Reagan email precisely because they don’t share or sell the addresses either. If you are getting this because someone forwarded it to you and you don’t want it, tell him or her not to forward any more. On the other hand, if you received a copy and would like to see more of my ranting, simply drop me a line at coxnotes@Reagan.com I will put you on my exclusive, but growing list.

 

Bob

 

© Robert R. Cox 2017

 

 

Colorado has two senators – or one senator and one Democrat

March 20, 2017

By Bob Cox

Some opinions, comments and links relating to what is happening in this great nation and, in particular, in Western Colorado.

 Over the past several years Colorado has been highlighted in ways that upset me, to say the least.

My opinions that direct this belief actually started in 1992 when the spring bear hunt was outlawed in Colorado. I am not a bear hunter and I happen to think that hunting laws need revision on a regular basis. I also believe we elected our state legislators to examine, modify and pass appropriate laws and that the initiative process in Colorado has been abused. Enough said about that.

I also think Colorado’s positions on things like the cartridge capacity of firearms magazines and the legalization of recreational marijuana have given us undue attention from the wrong people. There are several other examples I could cite, but we have already debated them over and over again. I, and people that think like me, have lost and we must look forward.

Colorado now has the chance to be noted for something else. We could have one of our own sitting on the Supreme Court. I don’t advocate for Judge Neil Gorsuch because I think that Colorado could get some preferential treatment, but rather because I truly think this man is qualified and I think there are those who oppose him simply because he was nominated by President Trump. His hearings start today.

Judge Gorsuch presently sits on the States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit Court in Denver. I have looked at several of his rulings as well as his dissenting opinions. I do not agree with all his decisions any more than I agree with any judge sitting on any bench, but I honestly think that Judge Gorsuch knows how to apply the rule of law and fully understands what the Constitution is meant to provide for the citizens of this great country.

We are going to hear a lot of baloney from those that oppose this appointment. They will bring up the judge’s comments on a hypothetical situation in which he told a law student that many women manipulate maternity leave policies of companies. It was a classroom discussion and was interpreted differently by students in that class, but we will likely only hear from those who oppose Gorsuch’s appointment and we will hear them say he is in favor of employers asking applicants what their family plans are.

We will also hear how this judge favors industry, but I only see that he favors the side he thinks is right (as in right and wrong, not right and left). He also seems to parallel the beliefs of Antonin Scalia, the judge he is replacing. That, in and of itself, is enough for my support.

Unfortunately, we as Coloradoans will have another blemish on our record after Judge Gorsuch is confirmed, which I believe he will be. We will probably be noted for having a senator that voted against this appointment based purely on party lines. Michael Bennet has done very little for Colorado as a whole. He has demonstrated, at least to me, that he is a Democrat first and a Coloradoan second.

Remember, I only send out these missives via email to those who have asked for them. I do not share your email addresses with anyone and I use the Reagan email precisely because they don’t share or sell the addresses either. If you are getting this because someone forwarded it to you and you don’t want it, tell him or her not to forward any more. On the other hand, if you received a copy and would like to see more of my ranting, simply drop me a line at coxnotes@Reagan.com I will put you on my exclusive, but growing list.

Bob

© Robert R. Cox 2017

 

 

 

Why are atheists afraid of God?

January 23, 2016

By Bob Cox

Some opinions, comments and links relating to what is happening in this great nation and, in particular, in Western Colorado.

Recently, while attempting to compile a comprehensive overview of my family history, I came across a document that confirmed the application my grandmother made to have a veteran’s headstone shipped to Cripple Creek to mark the grave of her husband, William R. Cox. The discovery of the document caused me to further research the process of obtaining such a headstone and what can be included such a marker.

On the top center of the headstone is a simple cross. The cross is known as a Latin cross and shows that the deceased veteran was a Christian. I wrongly assumed that the Latin cross and the Star of David were probably the only choices for markings on the headstones. In fact, there are several other crosses, among which are Presbyterian, Russian Orthodox, Lutheran, Episcopal, and Greek. There are several other versions.

Even the Star of David is not the only star available. The Bahai Star and the Muslim crescent and star are also choices, and while it certainly was not available when my grandfather died in 1954, one can even choose the Mjölnir (Thor’s hammer) to grace the top of a veteran’s headstone.

What brought all this to mind recently was a news story about a group of atheists in Belle Plaine, Minnesota who demanded that a large cross be removed from a local memorial. The memorial depicted a soldier kneeling at the grave of a fallen comrade, whose grave was marked with a cross.

The local veteran’s groups and the city gave in, and removed the large cross, replacing it with several smaller crosses that everyone agreed were “more appropriate.” That evidently did not satisfy some of the atheists who chose to rip the small crosses from the ground. Not only was that act a desecration of a venerated object it also defies logic.

That cross, like the cross on my grandfather’s grave, is just a symbol of what a person believes in, or believed in during his or her life. The memorial simply depicted a soldier recognizing his dead brother in arms. It was not an attempt by any government to “establish” a religion, which brings me to another point:

A surprising number of Americans believe that the words, “separation of church and state” are part of the First Amendment; they are not. In fact, if those people would take the time to read a little American History (a subject once taught in all schools) they would find out that the origin of that phrase is likely attributed to Thomas Jefferson, when he answered a letter to the Danbury Baptist Association of Connecticut; a letter that he wrote to bolster the First Amendment, not modify it.

Another symbol that certainly was not available fore etching on the headstone of an American hero at the time of my grandfather’s death is that the atomic symbol adopted by atheists. It is number 16 on the list of about 60 symbols on today’s application.

I have to wonder if a group of Christians would be all that upset if the Minnesota atheists were to have some sort of memorial built that showed a man standing at the grave of a friend, that grave being marked with the atomic symbol of atheism. I also have to wonder why these people that do not believe in God are so afraid of seeing any reference to him. After all, if I am wrong in my belief and God does not exist, I suffer no consequence. On the other hand, if they are wrong…

Remember, I only send out these missives as emails to those who have asked for them. I do not share your email addresses with anyone and I use the Reagan email precisely because they don’t share or sell the addresses either. If you are getting this because someone forwarded it to you and you don’t want it, tell him or her not to forward any more. On the other hand, if you received a copy and would like to see more of my ranting, simply drop me a line at coxnotes@Reagan.com I will put you on my exclusive, but growing list.

 

Bob

 

© Robert R. Cox 2017

 

 

The ‘Change’ I ‘Hoped’ For

January 16, 2017

By Bob Cox

Some opinions, comments and links relating to what is happening in this great nation and, in particular, in Western Colorado.

When Barack Obama first ran for president in 2008, he adopted a slogan of “hope and change.

Frankly, I think President Obama won that election for exactly the same reason that Donald Trump won the 2016 version, and that is because Hillary Clinton was a very bad candidate.

At any rate, within the first 100 days of the Obama administration, I began to believe in this “hope and change” concept. I was “hoping” we could get through his term(s) without irreparable damage to our basic representative republic and I started looking forward to a “change” when he would eventually leave office.

One of the most important changes that could have taken place during the Obama time was the change of the Supreme Court. We came very close to that happening. When Justice Antonin Scalia died last February, I could literally hear the anticipation in the voices and see the anxiety in the actions of many on the left and in the biased news media. They were almost giddy with the possibility that Barack Obama could replace Scalia, and do it in an election year. Thankfully, that did not happen.

I do not have any idea whether Donald Trump will be a good president. That remains to be seen, but I do know that any of the people on the supposed short list of those who might be nominated are far better than the activist judges we would have undoubtedly seen had the Progressive Liberals had their way.

I, like many of you, am limited to how much I can find out about any given judge, but based on what I see so far, I am impressed with several of them. I must admit that I have always thought that, given a person who has seen time on a federal bench as opposed to someone that has only state experience, I likely would select the person with the federal experience. That said I am drawn to one possible nominee that has only state experience, but has other attributes that leads me to believe she would make a great Supreme Court Judge.

Joan Larsen is a Michigan Supreme Court Justice. She is obviously bent toward the conservative line, but more than that, she appears to understand the purpose of the Supreme Court, and she clerked for the above-mentioned Antonin Scalia.

I know it sounds bad to some, but I also think that she has some attributes that could help in the confirmation process, and like it or not, those attributes will be considered.

First, she is a woman. There is no doubt that this country has come a long way since we tolerated the stereotyping and goofball ideas put forth by Jackie Gleason on The Honeymooners. Women long since stopped being just supporters of men and we need to recognize that, rather than listen to people like Hillary Clinton who demand to be looked at as inferior and as constant victims.

Secondly, Judge Larsen is, in the scheme of things, a young woman. At 48, she has the potential of sitting on the court through seven or eight more presidential elections.

There are 20 or so others on various lists and I keep looking up their names, but Larsen seems to come to the top each time.

Of course, I predict that, regardless who the nominee is, Colorado will have one senator who will vote against confirmation, not because of qualification, but because he is strictly partisan and is still trying to figure out why Donald Trump ended up with over 300 electoral votes. Senator Bennet’s seat is another place I am “hoping” for a “change” next time around.

Remember, I only send out these missives as emails to those who have asked for them. I do not share your email addresses with anyone and I use the Reagan email precisely because they don’t share or sell the addresses either. If you are getting this because someone forwarded it to you and you don’t want it, tell him or her not to forward any more. On the other hand, if you received a copy and would like to see more of my ranting, simply drop me a line at coxnotes@Reagan.com I will put you on my exclusive, but growing list.

 

Bob

 

© Robert R. Cox 2017

 

 

 

Still optimistic, but realistic

January 2, 2017

By Bob Cox

Some opinions, comments and links relating to what is happening in this great nation and, in particular, in Western Colorado.

Welcome to a new year. I seriously thought about giving up on this effort to express my opinions and try to keep in touch with what is going on in the world around me. I want to thank those of you who encouraged me to continue.

Sometimes, when I sit down to compose a paragraph or two about what I think about this or that, the topic literally changes as I write. Sometimes a thought will provoke absolute disdain for what some people are trying to do to a great nation. Other times I realize that deep down I am an optimist. I know this country will survive.

I am still somewhat stunned with the fact that this last election cycle turned out the way it did. I am also encouraged that the Electoral College system put into place so many years ago actually works. This past year demonstrated dramatically just what could happen if a few states with large populations could gain control of our national government.

For those of us who reside on the Western Slope of Colorado, we understand well how population centers get more of what they want, rather than what they are actually entitled to. We must remain vigilant in our selection of representatives and maintain the representative republic that has worked so well.

I remain a little concerned over some of the new laws we will have to live under as of yesterday. The one that concerns me most is the increase in minimum wage. The voters approved a constitutional hike to gradually raise the wage to $12 an hour in increments from now until 2020. For this year the wage goes from $8.31 to $9.30. I cannot help but think this has to hurt small businesses, at least in the short term, but it does something else. It gives unions and non-minimum wage earners an excuse to demand higher wages, and believe me that will happen.

Now, I am not against every new law. I think some of them are practical, although I understand why there are some people, even some of my friends, who disagree.

The new law that allows grocery stores to sell full strength beer and liquor is complicated to say the least, but I think it will work out okay. I remember the days in Colorado when someone 18 years old could buy beer that had “not more than 3.2 percent alcohol by weight.” When Colorado decided to repeal that law, they left the archaic idea of 3.2 beer hanging, allowing grocery stores to sell only 3.2 beer. Breweries were caught in the middle, having to continue to produce the product.

I could go on forever commenting on why the repeal of the law allowing 18-year-olds to purchase beer never accomplished the stated goals, but for now I will say that I will probably continue to go to my favorite liquor stores and now and then I will probably pick up a six-pack with my groceries, so personally, I am not upset about that new law.

Another law that goes into effect is the law concerning personnel files. The law makes it easier for employees to view their personnel files. It is sad, in my opinion, that this law is even needed. I have always thought that we all have the right to be told and shown what are in those files. It should be no different than a credit report. If there are things in there that are not accurate, we should have the opportunity to correct or dispute those things.

All in all, I am still the optimist. I look forward to this next year with a renewed sense of that optimism. I hope all of you share that with me.

Remember, I only send out these missives by email to those who have asked for them. I do not share your email addresses with anyone and I use the Reagan email precisely because they don’t share or sell the addresses either. If you are getting this because someone forwarded it to you and you don’t want it, tell him or her not to forward any more. On the other hand, if you received a copy and would like to see more of my ranting, simply drop me a line at coxnotes@Reagan.com I will put you on my exclusive, but growing list.

 

Bob

 

© Robert R. Cox 2017

 

 

Justice (?) Department

November 28, 2016

By Bob Cox

Some opinions, comments and links relating to what is happening in this great nation and, in particular, in Western Colorado.

I will be damned if I can figure out where our top-heavy, regulation oriented, United States Government is headed. It seems that, more and more, the bureaucrats are making worse and worse decisions.

It also seems to me that Colorado is all to often on the top of the headlines for some stupid reason.

The latest goofball turn of events is that the Denver Sheriff’s Office was fined by the U.S. Department of Justice for making U.S. citizenship a qualification for being hired as a deputy sheriff.

Let me clarify one thing before I go on: The Denver Sheriff’s Office is not typical of the rest of the state. Denver is both a city and a county and does not elect a sheriff as their chief law enforcement officer. Sheriff’s deputies in Denver County are responsible for maintaining the jail, transporting prisoners and serving civil process. Sheriff Patrick Firman is an appointee of the City and County of Denver. That being said, the deputies are Colorado law enforcement officers.

So, some guy goes to the Sheriff’s Office (probably through the Denver City and County Human Services) and applies for a job. He is turned down because he is not a citizen and evidently is not fluent in English. The Justice Department, through the Civil Rights Division gets involved. Ultimately, Sheriff Firman enters into an agreement with Alberto Ruisanchez, the deputy special counsel in the Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices. The Sheriff’s Office agrees to pay a $10,000 fine, but they agreed to a whole lot more.

Under the agreement, the S.O. will go through all job applications received from non-citizens and offer them another opportunity for employment “with no consideration of their citizenship status.” They are also agreeing to provide certain printed material in “applicant’s preferred language.”

This all means that a person whose English is so deficient that he (or she) has to have printed material in another language is expected to communicate efficiently with a population of inmates, the majority of whom speak English. He (or she) will be expected to transport prisoner to and from jail and to and from the courts and I suppose have a laptop with a version of Rosetta Stone in seven languages on the dash of the transport vehicle, for which they will probably be criticized for using because it distracts them from their driving, which they may not be able to do legally because they didn’t get a driver’s test in Archi.

Another twist on this whole thing is that a provision of Section 8 of the United States Code, which is the one supposedly violated by DSO, provides that it is not a violation to “hire, recruit, or refer an individual who is citizen or nation of the United Stated over another individual who is an alien if the two individuals are equally qualified.” In my evidently screwed up mind it would seem that the applicant who speaks English has an edge here. But that is just my opinion.

By the way, Archi is considered by many scholars to be the least known language in the world and is spoken only in a small village of just over 1,000 people who live in Southern Russia on the Caspian Sea. Putting up a “Right To Work Poster” in Archi could be difficult because one verb could have more than 1.5 million conjugations.

Remember, I only send out these missives to those who have asked for them. I do not share your email addresses with anyone and I use the Reagan email precisely because they don’t share or sell the addresses either. If you are getting this because someone forwarded it to you and you don’t want it, tell him or her not to forward any more. On the other hand, if you received a copy and would like to see more of my ranting, simply drop me a line at coxnotes@Reagan.com I will put you on my exclusive, but growing list.

 

Bob

 

© Robert R. Cox 2016